Uncategorized

Rules

It is possible that some rules in Education, Scholarship selection and Employment might have contributed to Burma’s Brain Drain.

  • In the early, there were no requirements for 3 NRC (National Registration Certificate for the individual and both parents) for university admission and for work.
    2 NRC (for the individual and one parent) was sufficient in many cases.
  • U Cho (Saya Shi Nai Chow), Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Rangoon and retired as Director of Pasteur Institute.
  • U Kyaw Win (Alex Ahad) graduated from the Faculty of Engineering, University of Rangoon and retired as Principal of the Labor Training School.
  • Then 3-NRC rule and discrimination for those having non-Burmese names (especially Chinese and Indian) took a toll on some unlucky ones.
    The 3 NRC rule was applied to (a) Collegiate Scholarships (b) State Scholar (c) Job Promotion
  • Bernard Khaw (SPHS65, brother of U Cho) stood First with four distinctions (English, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry) in the Matriculation examination in 1965.
    He scored 80+ marks in English.
    He could not apply for professional institutes.
    He left Burma to study abroad.
  • Chu Pu Thein (SPHS63) scored the highest marks in Physics in the High School Final (HSF) examination in 1962.
    He ended up studying in Italy.

Rule Changes

  • The rules change with time (sometimes for a window of opportunity).
  • For some time, expatriates could not visit Burma.
    The rule change abruptly when Number One married Yadana Nat Mei.
    The rule re-surfaced when they divorced.
  • A few students were unlucky and then became lucky.
    They had to wait for a year (mostly studying at RASU) before their nationality status was reviewed and accepted to the Institute of Medicine.
    It included one whose brother was earlier admitted to Defense Services Academy (DSA).
  • There were also cases where a few students were lucky and then became unlucky.
    One student was forced to change studies after studying for some time at the Institute of Medicine.

Categories: Uncategorized

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